Tag: Richard Saunders

NEW UK Rabbit Vaccine – RVHD2

Background

RVHD and Myxomatosis are diseases found throughout the UK and can be fatal to un-vaccinated rabbits. Both outdoor AND indoor rabbits are at risk. RVHD in particular is highly infectious and contagious.  It is an air borne virus that can be spread by direct and indirect contact with infected rabbits, food bowls, hutches and even the soles of your shoes. For example – if you, your dog or cat has walked on ground where a VHD infected rabbit has been, you can carry it on your clothes or shoes, your other pets can carry it on fur or feet. The virus can survive in the environment for a long time and can survive cold temperatures far better than you might expect.

 

Current Situation

The following info comes direct from the Rabbit Welfare Association and Fund. It was released in a ‘First Alert’ email. This service sends out an email whenever there is an important update in the rabbit world. You can register by emailing [email protected] and you can join the RWAF here.
“As you may know, over the past year there has been an increasing concern regarding RVHD “new variant 2” becoming a cause of deaths in several outbreaks in the UK. Whilst it has been noted in the UK in research papers (Westcott and Choudhury) for at least 2 years, it has clearly become a significant clinical entity in the past few months.
As a result, the RWAF, with valuable assistance from the APLA, Ann Pocknell (Finn Pathologists), Mark Stidworthy and Daniela Denk (IZVG) and Tariq Abou-Zahr (Great Western Referrals) have been putting together a disease risk assessment.
We (RWAF) have now successfully established an SIC (Special Import Certificate) for a suitable EU member state vaccine, Cunivak RHD, and placed an order for a small number of vaccines to establish an ordering system into the UK.
Vets can order their own supplies from VMD.  If they require any further information, they should contact the RWAF at [email protected] and we will pass on any veterinary queries to our vet, Mr Saunders,  but they should be aware that he may be dealing with a high volume of email. A more detailed explanation of the above should be available in Vet Times and Vet Record soon.”
What This Means For Owners.
 Firstly – please note that NO emails from owners about this topic will be passed to Dr Saunders. he will be dealing with Vet emails only due to the high volume of contact.
So for owners – this means you will need to ask your vets to order in the new vaccine which will take a few weeks for them to sort out. The new Cunivak vaccine is NOT a replacement for the current combo vaccine and will need to be given AS WELL AS the Nobivak one. Its important to note that these vaccines CANNOT be given at the same time and need at least a 2 week gap between them.
In total, your rabbit will now require 2 vaccinations (comprising of 3 injections) per year:
1) Nobivak combo – Just one injection covers them for myxomatosis and RHVD1.
2) Cunivak RHVD – 2 injections 3 weeks apart. This covers them against RHVD2.
PLEASE SEE THE MOST UP TO DATE POST RE VACCINE OPTIONS!
You need to leave AT LEAST 2 weeks gap between the different types of vaccines. If you can manage to schedule it so that there is a gap of 4-6 months between vaccines then this would mean your rabbit would have a veterinary health check up approx every 6 months. BUT you don’t HAVE to work to this schedule, just make sure there is at least 2 weeks between vaccines.
Please contact your vets and ask them to start the process of ordering in the new Cunivak RHD vaccine. Most vets will not be aware that they can do this as the information has only just been released. But the quicker you contact them, the quicker they can get up to speed and get the vaccines in stock. If your vets are unsure, please advise them to email [email protected] for more info. As per the RWAF first alert above, this information will be released in veterinary publications in the coming weeks.
Summary.
If your rabbit is vaccinated with the Nobivac combi vaccine AND the Cunivak vaccine, they will have been vaccinated against Myxo, RHVD1 and RHVD2. As always, no vaccination is 100% effective and it does not mean your pet will not contract the disease. However, it does mean they have a chance to be treated and survive these normally fatal illnesses.
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Is Your Vet Rabbit Savvy?

RWAF Vet Membership

RWAF Vet Membership

Really??? Are you 100% sure???

You may be shocked to find out that not all Vets are well trained in rabbits 🙁 Many can have as little as a 2 week slot for exotics as a whole (including reptiles, birds and small furries). This means that the majority of Vets out there have very little knowledge of rabbits needs, behaviours, ailments and how to treat them correctly.

The Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) released a statement for Rabbit Awareness Week 2014 which briefly explains how vets can be accredited (but this is not species specific). A student Vets training changes depending on which University they attend. Some, Like The Royal Dick in Edinburgh and Bristol University have some VERY rabbit savvy lecturers (Like  Anna Meridith, Kevin Eatwell, Brigitte Lord, Emma Keeble, Jenna Richardson and Richard Saunders. This means the graduates have a higher level of rabbit knowledge.

Of course, there are a host of fabulous Veterinary textbooks that are written by top rabbit specialists but not all Veterinary Practices have these in their library.

After graduation, Vets are required to undertake a minimum of 105 hours of training / learning over a rolling 3 year period. There are lots of rabbit courses available and even some FREE ones!

So…what can you do?

Well – a rabbit savvy Vet is worth their weight in gold and it is VITAL that you find one before you need them. For those of you in the UK you can contact the Rabbit Welfare Association and Fund (RWAF) as they hold a list of good rabbit vets located across the whole of the UK.

For those in the USA then you can contact the House Rabbit Association as they hold a USA wide list. This forum, Bunny Lovers Unite, has a list of good rabbit vets worldwide that has been complied by its members experiences.

It is important that you as an owner, understand what makes a good rabbit vet. This will help you to find out if your current vet knows as much as they should to help treat your pet.

1) The most important aspect in my opinion is pain relief. Rabbits are prey species and hide their pain very well. Many, un savvy vets will believe that rabbits do not routinely need pain relief. THIS IS NOT TRUE!!! In most cases a sick rabbit will be experiencing pain and will need a good non steriodal anti inflammatory drug to help control this (Meloxicam is the drug of choice for pain control in rabbits and can be found under the brand names of Metacam, Loxicom, Meloxidyl and others). Although it is not technically licesnsed for rabbits – it can be used under the cascade system and the vet may ask you to sign an ‘off license’ agreement form. Bear in mind that there are hardly any drugs licensed for rabbits (even though almost all of our human and Veterinary medicines have been tested on rabbits at some point). Adequate pain relief should be given routinely after rabbit neutering as well for at least 3 days post op.

2) Never starve your rabbit before an operation. Walk away from any Vet who recommends this! Generally, mammals are starved before an operation (humans included). This is to reduce the risk of the patient vomiting whilst under general anaesthetic. Rabbits cannot vomit so do not have this risk. Also, a rabbits metabolism is high and their guts are sensitive – it is imperative they continue to eat frequently (up to approx 1 hour) before their operation. Also, the Vet should not discharge the rabbit after an operation until it is eating and passing faeces.

3) All rabbits (that are not being used for breeding) should be neutered. Any Vet that disagrees with this fact (especially for female rabbits) is questionable. Female rabbits have an 80% risk of uterine cancer. This is the main reason to neuter (more so than accidental litters). Add to this the fact that un neutered rabbits can display unwanted behaviour changes such as becoming more aggressive and territorial, spraying urine, humping and generally being more stressed. So always spey the females and castrate the males to give them the best chance at a happy healthy life.

Lastly, if you really like your current vet and do not want to change – you can always ask them to contact rabbit specialists if ever your rabbit gets sick. The RWAF offer a Veterinary Membership which practices can sign up to. This give them lots of benefits – one of which is direct access to Richard Saunders who is one of the UK’s top rabbit specialists. Even if your Vet will not sign up to this scheme, many rabbit specialists will offer advice to other Veterinarians for a small fee.

For more info on finding a good UK rabbit savvy vet click here.

For more info on finding a good USA rabbit savvy vet see this article here.

 

 

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